Frequently Asked

FAQ

What does Right to be Forgotten mean?

Right to be Forgotten means the right to forget information in online search results that is inaccurate, inappropriate or outdated. It is also commonly known as the “right to remove.” The R2BF movement believes that everyone should have a voice in determining how their personal information is displayed in online search results. That’s why we are raising awareness of this issue.

What is the Right to be Forgotten movement?

The R2BF movement supports giving the American public an effective way to control old, inaccurate and irrelevant information in their search results, thereby preserving their privacy and freedom. Thus, the movement focuses on developing legislation that protects the reputations of individuals in online search results while adhering to America’s traditions, values and rules of law surrounding access to information and freedom of expression.

What is the campaign/movement hoping to change?

The Right to be Forgotten movement is raising awareness and empowering individuals to raise their voices in support of the concept around the right to remove. By signing the petition and tweeting or emailing your leaders in Congress, you are showing your support of the movement and helping to raise awareness of the campaign. The movement aims to change the autonomy that individuals have over their personal information and what is stored online, for how long, and so forth. As well, the movement is hoping to give the American public a clear pathway for remediating inaccurate, outdated or inappropriate information that is available about them publicly on a search engine.

Why doesn’t America already have the Right to be Forgotten?

America does not currently have legislation, policies or rights that regulate or mandate how search engines and the Internet are managed for inappropriate, inaccurate or outdated information. It has been nearly 20 years since Congress passed a major piece of legislation to protect consumers in the expanding technology and Internet Age, and none of the existing laws adequately address the negative effects of outdated search results. The Right to be Forgotten Movement is proposing that American legislators work to find a solution for this lack of effective regulation.

Do other countries have a Right to be Forgotten?

Yes, countries in the European Union have a version of Right to be Forgotten, thanks to the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) that was passed in April 2016 and put into effect in May 2018. The GDPR is mostly regulation to enforce that data belongs to consumers and not companies. There is a clause called “Data Erasure,” also known as “Right to be Forgotten,” that entitles an individual to have a data controller erase his or her personal data. It also allows that individual to cease further dissemination of the data, and potentially have third parties halt processing data. The prerequisites for erasure include the data no longer being relevant to original purposes for processing or a data subject’s withdrawing consent. It should also be noted that this right requires controllers to compare the subjects’ rights to “the public interest in the availability of the data” when considering such requests. For more information on the right to remove under the GDPR, visit https://eugdpr.org or the European Commission website.

What is the General Data Protection Regulation or GDPR?

The EU General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) is designed to harmonized data privacy laws across Europe; protect and empower all EU citizens’ data privacy; and, reshape the way organizations across Europe approach data privacy. For more information on GDPR, visit https://eugdpr.org or the European Commission website.

Is GDPR related to Right to be Forgotten?

The GDPR passed in Europe has an element that relates to the Right to be Forgotten; however, the GDPR is broader. GDPR reshapes the way in which the business sector manages data, and it redefines the roles for key leaders in businesses that manage data. For more information on GDPR, visit https://eugdpr.org or the European Commission website.

Is Right to be Forgotten similar to the recent data privacy laws, or attempts to pass such laws, in New York, California and other states?

No. The data privacy laws in New York and California focus on how personal data and information is collected, stored and used. Right to be Forgotten focuses solely on online search results. While the work started in California and New York reflects the goals of finding a reasonable balance for how companies operate online, the regulation proposed neglects the key issue behind the Right to be Forgotten movement: the persistence of outdated, inaccurate or inappropriate materials in online search results.

Is Right to be Forgotten covered in the California Privacy Act?

No. While California passed the nation’s toughest data privacy law in June of 2018, giving individuals far-reaching control over their personal data, it does not address online search results. The law, slated to go into effect in 2020, grants Californians three major rights: the right to ask companies to disclose what data they have collected on them; the right to demand that they not sell the data or share it with third parties for business purposes; and the right to sue or fine companies that violate the law. Learn more about the California Privacy Act at its website: https://www.caprivacy.org/

The Right to be Forgotten movement sounds like a good idea but does it conflict with the Right to Know or Free Speech?

The American ideals of free speech and freedom of the press are sacred. The R2BF movement does not view these as being in opposition with the Right to be Forgotten. We support a definition of the Right to be Forgotten such that it preserves and augments the freedoms of the individual, while continuing to support free speech. Many have implicitly equated the top page of Google search results with “free speech”, when in fact all search engines are merely private websites with arbitrary, robotic views of what is important and what is not. Search engines hold too much power today and should not be the de facto arbiters of free speech.

Isn’t online information protected by the First Amendment in the United States?

Having autonomy over your online information and how it’s displayed in online media enables individual freedoms that align with American values and truths. Having a voice in remedying inaccurate, outdated and inappropriate information is renewing an individual’s right to freedom of speech and expression for their own identity.

The Right to be Forgotten movement is intending to be an augmentation of our base right, not limiting freedom of speech and expression through censorship. The American ideals of free speech and freedom of the press are sacred. We do not view these as being in opposition with the Right to be Forgotten. Thus, we must urge our politicians to take up this issue and provide laws that protect our data and our privacy while supporting free speech. They must create a definition of the Right to be Forgotten that preserves and augments the freedoms of the individual, while continuing to support our Constitutional Rights.

How can I support Right to be Forgotten?

Join our campaign by signing your name to the petition to show lawmakers that they need to act now and start legislation to ensure this right. By signing the petition, you are showing your representatives in Congress that creating legislating around the Right to be Forgotten is important to you. In addition to signing the petition, you can tweet your legislator and/or share the campaign on your Facebook and Twitter profile.

Who is involved in the Right to be Forgotten movement?

The R2BF movement is sponsored by ReputationDefender. For more than 10 years, ReputationDefender has dedicated itself to helping people manage their information on the Internet. To learn more about ReputationDefender, visit https://www.reputationdefender.com/.

What is ReputationDefender?

ReputationDefender is a leading global firm in the field of digital privacy and online reputation management. While we wait for Congress to act, you can take steps now to protect your online reputation and your privacy. Our paid services are ready to help you today. Visit ReputationDefender.com or call 1 (888) 850-8805 and learn how we can help you.

Why is ReputationDefender sponsoring the Right to be Forgotten movement?

For more than 10 years, ReputationDefender has dedicated itself to helping people manage their information on the Internet. ReputationDefender believes strongly that everyone has the right to be empowered online – whether that means controlling the spread of your personal information or the way you are portrayed to others. Having more autonomy and control over inaccurate, inappropriate or outdated information in search results via a Right to be Forgotten supports that mission.

Can I get more involved with the Right to be Forgotten movement?

Yes! We’d love to hear from you. Contact us and let us know how you’d like to get more involved.

How can I speak to a spokesperson for the Right to be Forgotten movement?

Complete a press inquiry or fill out the form on the Contact Us page or https://righttobeforgotten.org/contact/. A representative of the movement and/or ReputationDefender will be in touch shortly.

How can I protect my personal data and online identity now?

If you have an issue with your online search results that you want to address immediately, ReputationDefender can you help you take steps now to protect your online reputation and protect your privacy. Visit ReputationDefender.com or call 1 (888) 850-8805 and learn how we can help you.